Month: March 2017

“Deport now, appeal later” or start again? Guidance on fresh claims and s.94B certifications in immigration judicial reviews

Home Office powers to cut the number of appeals against immigration refusals have enabled a boom in judicial reviews and fresh claims. That trend is likely to continue following new guidance from the Upper Tribunal.

Landlord recovers legal costs from tenant despite no legal action being taken

A recent Upper Tribunal decision has allowed the landlord of a leasehold property to use the service charge to recover the costs of defending against a threatened legal action.

Parents’ immigration history is relevant to whether it’s reasonable to remove settled children from the UK

Senior judges have found (yet again) that children can be punished for the sins of their parents, giving a green-light to the Home Office to remove families from the UK (even if they have not committed any crime).

How to use statistics and dental x-rays in age assessment disputes?

The Upper Tribunal has given guidance on the correct approach to statistical evidence in the context of dental x-rays in age assessment disputes.

Gearing up for International Women’s Day: an urban cycling story #IWD2017

Sun’s out. It’s time to get back on the bike and bask in it. But there’s a roadblock of sexism ahead that we need to dismantle #IWD2017

No such thing as an average case where children are concerned, says Court of Appeal

There is a growing judicial consensus that the demanding test for serious offenders to resist deportation on grounds of family life ought to be applied with some flexibility.

UPDATE: Home Office delay of 9 years ‘critical’ in deportation appeal

Severe delays are not uncommon in immigration and asylum cases, as many applicants discover to their dismay. Here, Home Office inertia was a key reason why a woman’s deportation became unlawful.

Rights of the Child: a 36 Immigration forum

“Every child matters”: but in immigration law, some children matter more than others. Join us for a lively discussion of the major legal developments on child rights in the immigration context followed by food and drink.