All posts by Ben Amunwa

Founder and editor of Lawmostly.com. Ben is a commercial and public law barrister with The 36 Group. He gives expert legal advice on employment, public law and commercial disputes to a wide range of clients.

What does the junior doctors’ strike tell us about UK employment law?

As junior doctors continue strike action against UK Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt’s plans to impose new contracts, there seems to […]

1 suicide attempt everyday at UK immigration detention centres

There were a shocking 393 reported attempts across the detention estate in 2015: the highest number on record and an average […]

How many students has Theresa May deported unlawfully?

Hundreds? Thousands? 48,000? Up to 50,000? It’s not clear.

Artist wins her appeal against seizure of whale-bone sculpture

It’s not every case that fuses international law, endangered species, border controls and fine art. But Juliet Forster-Copperi v Director […]

40 percent of UK deportations cancelled, says new report

The latest report from the Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration, David Bolt, confirms that 4 out of 10 […]

Good news for students deported on flimsy evidence of fraud

The Independent reports that the Upper Tribunal has found in favour of students who had their leave to remain cancelled […]

All new facebook page launched

Another way you way contact me. What’s not to like? Hi all. I now have a facebook page to shamelessly promote […]

Fresh articles on housing, immigration and costs

For those of you interested in civil, housing, immigration & costs law, please visit my publications page where I’ve uploaded […]

The awful truth about the detention of torture survivors in the UK

Torture survivors should not normally be detained by the Home Office. But the awful truth is that they are. Regularly.

the justice gap: New secret evidence rule in immigration tribunal lawful but should ‘almost never be used’

A version of my blog on the secret evidence rule in the Immigration Tribunal was kindly published by the justice gap. […]