All posts by Ben Amunwa

Founder and editor of Lawmostly.com. Ben is a commercial and public law barrister with The 36 Group. He gives expert legal advice on employment, public law and commercial disputes to a wide range of clients.

What does @PregnantThenScrewed vs HM Treasury mean for the future of indirect discrimination?

The Court of Appeal has given judgment in an important case concerning the law of indirect discrimination, offering broad guidance relevant to cases across public law / human rights, employment, services and education.

Still image from a video post on Melanie Sykes' Instagram account

Neurodiversity at work: an introduction

What are the key employment law issues that employers need to know when supporting neurodiverse staff? Discover the relevant legal rights and duties and hear insights from neurodiverse individuals

Colour blocked illustration of a server room

Do no harm: ECJ finds in favour of meta-search engines in ‘database right’ dispute

The European Court of Justice has made it potentially harder for EU database-makers to protect the contents of their databases from being extracted or re-used by meta-search engines and online content aggregators.

Tribunal rejects claim by employee sacked for refusing to wear a mask

In a legal first, the Employment Tribunal has decided whether it was fair for an employer to dismiss an employee who refused to wear a mask when making site deliveries during the coronavirus pandemic.

Pregnant then Screwed? High Court finds no discrimination in pandemic payments to self-employed mothers

An unsuccessful judicial review challenge to the impact of pandemic support payments to self-employed mothers sheds light on the equality outcomes of UK government policy

High Court finds ‘huge delay’ in the Home Office provision of asylum support accommodation

The Court found that the lack of effective monitoring rendered the government’s system of asylum support unlawful and discriminatory

Why maladministration claims just got even tougher 🤨⚖️

At a time when coronavirus legislation has softened the duties on local authorities to meet adult social care needs, a recent decision of the High Court has made it harder for claimants to use human rights law to seek compensation for delays and maladministration.

[UPDATED]: How to appeal the refusal of primary school places: an intro for parents & carers

On National Primary School Offer Day, parents and carers across the UK find out whether their children have been offered a place at their preferred maintained Primary School. Here’s a quick introduction to appealing refusal decisions and an overview of the new COVID-19 rule changes.

Systemic challenge to the imprisonment of immigration detainees fails

In late March 2020 the Home Office released some 300 immigration detainees to avoid the risk of spreading coronavirus. Hundreds more remain in detention and some are held on the prison estate. The fairness of imprisoning immigration detainees was tested in a recent, unsuccessful legal challenge.

This is the most sensible guidance on remote hearings that I’ve read so far📱👌🏽

Much has written about remote video hearings since the COVID-19 lockdown and there remain plenty of issues to consider. New, handy guidance from the Employment Tribunal offers a bunch of tips for better video hearings.