All posts by Ben Amunwa

Founder and editor of Lawmostly.com. Ben is a business and public law barrister with the 36 Group. He gives expert legal advice on employment, immigration and commercial disputes to a wide range of clients.

Vedanta to face class action lawsuit over copper-mine pollution in Zambia – says Court of Appeal

The mining multinational is being sued by almost 2,000 Zambian citizens who claim that the company polluted their land and waterways over the course of a decade.

The 7 year rule: immigration law resources for families with children

Lots of you are searching for the ‘7 year rule’: a Home Office concession relating to children who have lived continuously in the UK for 7 years. Here are my top 7 posts on the topic, all in one place.

Bye-bye Sala? Relatives of EEA nationals score victory as Court overturns decision that denied them appeal rights

Exclusive update from Rajiv Sharma of the 36 Group on a major case that has overturned the Upper Tribunal judgment in Sala which denied appeal rights to extended family members of EEA nationals.

Immigration Tribunal can re-open regulator’s disciplinary findings

Did you know that the Immigration Tribunal can decide on disciplinary charges against rogue legal advisors? (Me neither). But a recent case sheds light on the Tribunal’s powers to disagree with the regulator and decide the matter for itself.

Addison Lee drivers win claim for minimum wage and holiday pay

In the latest #gigeconomy legal dispute, the Employment Tribunal found drivers for private cab company Addison Lee were entitled to a raft of basic labour rights.

#UberAppeal: app argues its drivers aren’t ‘workers’ in latest gig economy legal battle

The controversial ride-hailing app is trying to overturn a judgment that would hand thousands of its drivers basic workers rights. Here’s what I learned live-tweeting on the morning of Day 1 of the appeal.

Immigration Judge hammered for “serious errors” in unprecedented decision

This Judges decisions were so bad that nobody really knows what he is talking about, or if he bothered to read the law or the papers. Upsetting when you think that in some cases, people’s lives depend on the outcome.

When does a flawed cross-examination result in a successful appeal?

Trial lawyers should note the Privy Council’s recent guidance on when Judges can disbelieve witnesses on the basis of facts not put to the witness in cross-examination.

Home Office to pay indemnity costs for defying High Court orders

A High Court judge has expressed “deep concern” at Amber Rudd’s failure to release and accommodate a vulnerable, claimed victim of torture from immigration detention, in breach of several Court orders.

Law Society to face negligence claim over its “Find a Solicitor” search engine

Over 1 million people a month use the Law Society’s “Find a Solicitor” tool. But who pays the price if one of those searches turns out to be wrong?