Home Office to pay indemnity costs for defying High Court orders

A High Court judge has expressed “deep concern” at Amber Rudd’s failure to release and accommodate a vulnerable, claimed victim of torture from immigration detention, in breach of several Court orders.

Law Society to face negligence claim over its “Find a Solicitor” search engine

Over 1 million people a month use the Law Society’s “Find a Solicitor” tool. But who pays the price if one of those searches turns out to be wrong?

Home is wherever the ‘integration test’ says it is, (for migrants facing removal from the UK).

Immigration Judges use this test to decide whether a person who is to be removed or deported should be allowed to stay in the UK based on their human right to private life.

Can a genuine couple be party to a ‘marriage of convenience’?

If your main reason for marrying is to secure an immigration advantage, you may find yourself in what lawyers call a “marriage of convenience”, with potentially serious legal consequences.

Postperson wins employment appeal, upends discrimination law in the process

The Employment Appeal Tribunal has concluded that Claimants do not need to prove the primary facts of their claims for discrimination. Once a valid complaint is presented, it is for the employer to disprove it.

When can a party be excused for “very poor” conduct in civil litigation?

A company caught up in British Telecomm’s supply chain litigation asked for relief from sanctions after “very poor” conduct. The result will surprise you.

What’s new in the 2017 Administrative Court guide on judicial reviews?

Claimants and Defendants in judicial review claims should be familiar with this new Court guide or they could face adverse costs consequences. In this post, Law mostly gives you a comparative analysis of the key changes from last year’s guide.

No wasted costs orders against HOPOs* in the Immigration Tribunal

A powerful legal weapon, the Wasted Costs Order, cannot be used against Home Office employees if they behave improperly in the Immigration Tribunal, limiting the ways in which the government and its employees can be held accountable for their conduct in Tribunal proceedings.

Major case clarifies liability of healthcare professionals for gross negligence manslaughter

The Court of Appeal has clarified the correct approach to the issue of reasonable foreseeability in gross negligence manslaughter cases, with implications for a vast number of regulated healthcare professionals.

The Home Office held this LGBT woman in a ‘punishment room’ in breach of her human rights

The widespread use of ‘segregation’ to control persons detained by the Home Office is under the spotlight after a female asylum seeker won her court battle against the practice. A new Home Office policy has been published as a result.