Home Office discriminated against mentally ill detainee in breach of duty to make reasonable adjustments

This Court of Appeal case shows that thinking outside the box and utilising discrimination legislation can help to address gaps in government policy and procedure.

Happy 2nd anniversary Law, mostly!

It’s time to celebrate! The last 2 years have been quite a ride and I’m looking forward to utilising the blog differently this year. Thanks for making it a great place to be.

Should Judges recuse themselves if they practise in the same chambers as a barrister in the case?

Allegations of bias against Judges are treated with healthy scepticism. But litigators should be alert to complications that can arise when Judges have links to the lawyers in a case. In a recent commercial dispute, the Court of Appeal discussed the right approach to secure fairness and justice.

International students win right to challenge accusations of cheating in the UK

This Court of Appeal judgment affects thousands of international students accused of cheating in English language tests. While it strengthens the right to challenge the Home Office, the fallout is likely to be long-lasting and complicated.

BREAKING: Families of EU Nationals Win Court Battle for Right of Appeal

In a significant blow to the Home Office, the Court of Appeal has found that relatives of EEA nationals were wrongly denied the right of appeal to the immigration tribunal. An important step forward for protecting citizens rights in the UK.

New settled status for EU citizens in the UK (somewhat) clarified

A cautious welcome is appropriate to the government’s new documents on #citizensrights of the 3 million EU nationals in the UK. It remains to be seen how the new system will live up to aspirations.

Separate, but (un)equal? How gender-based segregation in co-ed faith schools unlawfully discriminates

The Court of Appeal has found that separating male and female pupils in a co-ed faith school directly discriminates against each child under equalities law. This case could have far-reaching implications for educators and employers.

The Supreme Court just overturned the dishonesty test in R v Ghosh. Here’s why.

This high-stakes gambling case makes a significant change to the landscape of criminal, civil fraud and professional misconduct law. It will be of interest to many lawyers, plus students and teachers of law.

Government admits policy change led to unlawful detention of hundreds of torture victims

As reported in the Guardian, the UK government admitted to unlawfully detaining hundreds of claimed victims of torture under its new policy, which was supposed to reduce the number of vulnerable persons held in immigration detention.

Vedanta to face class action lawsuit over copper-mine pollution in Zambia – says Court of Appeal

The mining multinational is being sued by almost 2,000 Zambian citizens who claim that the company polluted their land and waterways over the course of a decade.